2009-06-13 / Top News

New Island Group Welcomes All Knitters

LeeAnn Ewer demonstrates an old knitting technique that knits two socks at once to the knitting group at JL Beanery Coffeehouse Tuesday, June 2. It involves alternating the stitches on the needles and using two strands of yarn. "You know how you make one thing and you're really excited about it until you remember you have to do it again?" she asked. "Now I won't have to do that." LeeAnn Ewer demonstrates an old knitting technique that knits two socks at once to the knitting group at JL Beanery Coffeehouse Tuesday, June 2. It involves alternating the stitches on the needles and using two strands of yarn. "You know how you make one thing and you're really excited about it until you remember you have to do it again?" she asked. "Now I won't have to do that." One corner of JL Beanery Coffeehouse is set aside for knitting and crocheting every Tuesday at 8:15 a.m., when several summer workers gather to share their favorite pastime and meet new faces.

The idea of forming a knitting group came to LeeAnn Ewer, a historical interpreter at Fort Mackinac who learned to knit in college.

"I learned in a fit of jealousy," she said. "My friend in college would make beautiful, gorgeous, knee-high socks. She would make plans to see a movie with us and then change her mind. When we would come home, she would be knitting. At the time I hated her for it, but then I realized I wanted to knit."

Historical interpreters Claire Herholb, Bri Dumois, and Amy Pavlov have joined the group, and others are welcome, Ms. Ewer said, to learn about knitting and crocheting and to meet new friends in the community.

Amy Pavlov laughs as she explains she is making washcloths because she doesn't have the patience for scarves. She is part of a knitting group that meets Tuesday mornings at JL Beanery. Amy Pavlov laughs as she explains she is making washcloths because she doesn't have the patience for scarves. She is part of a knitting group that meets Tuesday mornings at JL Beanery. Miss Herholb said she learned to crochet out of necessity. When she was told she was giving a crocheting demonstration at work at a historical site in Michigan, she rushed home so her mother could give her a crash course in the craft.

Miss Ewer said a knitting friend on the Island has been thinking about organizing a community-wide knitting project for charity, and suggests that, until then, the JL Beanery group find a local charity or shelter that needs blankets or scarves or articles for babies or new mothers.

"It's nice to help people in other places, but it's also nice to help people at home," she said.

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