2009-06-13 / Top News

Pavlov and Woodcox Promoted to Fort's Lead Interpreters

By Jane Alexander

Amy Pavlov was promoted to lead historic house interpreter this season. Amy Pavlov was promoted to lead historic house interpreter this season. Fort Mackinac historic interpreters Amy Pavlov and Geoff Woodcox have been promoted to lead interpreters this season.

Interpreter work seasons begin in May or June and lasts until August or October, when the fort closes for visitors.

"For me, most of all, I think being a lead interpreter means being a good example," Mr. Woodcox said. "Trying to show everybody how things should be done, so that they will do it right. It's kind of nice, I guess, because you have more of a say over when you get to come in and what you get to do."

Fort interpreters, also called interpreters of history, dress in costumes from the 19th century. The men, known as historic interpreters, dress in the uniforms of Fort Mackinac soldiers of the 1880s. The women, known as historic house interpreters, wear period dresses. They greet fort visitors and demonstrate the lifestyle of the time period.

Miss Pavlov said she was excited to hear of the promotions because she so enjoys her work at the fort.

Geoff Woodcox giving a presentation at Fort Mackinac. Mr. Woodcox was promoted to lead historic interpreter this season. Geoff Woodcox giving a presentation at Fort Mackinac. Mr. Woodcox was promoted to lead historic interpreter this season. "I love it," Miss Pavlov said. "I love all of the different sites, the people we get to work with, the people we get to meet, but I think I love the challenge of it most, trying to interact and connect with each person as you're meeting them and make a positive influence on their day."

Miss Pavlov was graduated from Marygrove College in Detroit with degrees in English and biology. She began working on the Island four years ago.

"I came on a trip with some friends and just fell in love," she said.

Miss Pavlov hopes to be a writer, and has written a children's book with a fellow employee at the fort. At Marygrove College, she earned the Distinguished Alumni of Tomorrow Award for her grades and numerous extracurricular activities.

Miss Pavlov says she can apply many of the skills she learned at the fort to other aspects of her life.

"I've taken public speaking courses with my English major and I breeze past them," she said, "because I'm already comfortable with speaking in public and I'm already comfortable with thinking on my feet and being able to recall information whenever I need to."

Mr. Woodcox, too, can apply his experience at the fort to his future career. He is a graduate student at Cooperstown Graduate Program in New York, learning museum studies. Mr. Woodcox completed his undergraduate studies at Northern Michigan University with a degree in photography. He is from Coldwater, and this is his fifth summer at the fort.

"I would love to run a place like this someday, a historic site or museum like this, or even work here again in a more professional capacity," he said. "I think that'd be the ultimate goal. It's a lot of fun and very interesting, and you meet so many cool people."

Miss Pavlov said she has thoroughly enjoyed her time at the fort.

"It's a lot of fun," she said. "It's a challenge, but it really pulls a lot out of you, it requires a lot of you. It's exciting. Plus, I get to wear a pretty dress!"

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