2012-06-09 / Looking Back

Lookiing

125 YEARS AGO The St. Ignace News Tuesday, June 7, 1887

There were 6,888 messages handled at the W. U. telegraph office in this city during May.

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The steamer Gazelle is ready for the Island route as soon as the inspectors come and look her over. They are expected every day.

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Adolph Highstone, who has been in the employ of S. Highstone, has left his old position and we understand will travel in his own interest in the northern interior.

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Who says that St. Ignace “haint a boomin’?” This morning five freight and passenger boats were loading and unloading at the same time at Merchandise dock.

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Lineman Stack is busy building a loop in the telegraph line between the dock and city offices, which facilitate the dispatch of business greatly, giving the city direct communication with Detroit at any time without interfering with the line between the dock and Marquette.

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To keep stoves stored away for the summer from rusting, the American Inventor says that if a lump of pure lime be placed in the stove it will completely prevent rusting on the inside, and if a peck or so of slaked be kept in the room where the stoves are stored, no outside rust will form. Lime is a powerful absorbent of water, four quarts having the power to absorb two quarts of water.

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A fine family carriage marked Mulcrone Bros. has recently made its appearance at Merchandise dock.

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The Martel Furnace Co. have built a new telephone line between their place and the Merchandise dock, which was badly needed.

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E. Larocque went to the woods yesterday and got out timbers for a 20x30 foot barn, which he will erect on his lot opposite the Congregational church as soon as possible.

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Horace Silsby, of the celebrated Silsby steam fire engine works, Seneca Falls, N. Y., has been in the city the past two days. We hope his visit will result in better fire protection here in the near future.

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Two large scows left her yesterday morning for Chicago, towed by a tug, loaded with 37,000 cedar posts and 22,000 ties, shipped by the Mackinaw Lumber Co.

Mackinac Island Notes

The fire engine was out on Friday, but on account of not having any hose it would not be properly tested. It is te general belief, however, that the engine is a good one.

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The old Biddle house is being removed to Mr. Brown’s lot, near Lorenze Holden’s place. Mr. Field, of St. Ignace, as the contract of moving it.

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Misses Maggie and Nellie Geary arrived home from Chicago last Friday.

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The U. S. supply ship Warrington was here Saturday with the inspector aboard. He says that Mr. Harrington has no lease of or title to Biddle’s Point. It belongs to the Government, and although he can build on it, yet it is liable to be moved off at any time.

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Work on Mr. Anthony’s cottage has commenced.

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Mrs. David Carson has rented Jas. Hoban’s cottage for the summer for the purpose of keeping boarders. Mrs. Carson has long been known here as a popular landlady, and we hope she will have unlimited success for she certainly deserves it.

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Died at Mackinac, June 5th, 1887, Joseph Louisignaw, aged 67 years. His sickness was short and he appeared to be afflicted with no particular disease – it was a gradual wearing out. Mr. Louisignaw was born on the Island and has lived here all his life. He was liked and respected by all the Island people, and it is safe to say that among all his acquaintances he had not an enemy. The funeral will be from the Catholic church at 9 o’clock this morning.

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C. W. Caskey says that the Grand will be finished by July 1, and he ought to know if anyone does.

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Guy G. Bailey, associate editor of the Watchman and champion masher of the Island, has accepted the position of chief druggist in Hulett & Miner’s drug store at St. Ignace. He will take charge of the store the coming Wednesday. Guy is one of our most popular young men, and if there is anyone who can fix up a dose of rat poison better than he, we would like to see him. When Guy takes his departure for the city he will find each and everyone of the girls with a large table cloth to catch her tears as they fall from her beautiful eyes. Readers of the Watchman will greatly miss his interesting articles.

•••

Wm. Marshall and Patrick Chambers arrived from the Reef Saturday.

•••

The Royce & Lansing Co. played here Friday night to a crowded house. This Co. is all that it is claimed to be, and everybody went home feeling that they had received the worth of their money. Ray Royce’s impersonation of a girl was perfect, and his gestures and shoulder shrugs reminded us of the typical Mackinac girl.

120 YEARS AGO The St. Ignace News Saturday, June 4, 1892

The mill was shut down part of Monday last on account of the bursting of a steam pipe.

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The steam barges Newburgh and Cuba loaded with big iron at the Merchandise dock this week.

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The Board of Supervisors appropriated $250 towards draining the Marley lands in the vicinity of the court house.

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Ronald Rankin has built a plank walk between Rankin’s harness shop and the Clark building, leading to his boat house and workshop.

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What a happy world this would be if a woman had as much confidence in her husband’s word as she usually has in the word of a peddler.

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In taking down the stove – which is “all the rage” this season of the year – if any soot should fall upon the carpet or rug, cover quickly with dry salt before sweeping and not a mark will be left.

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Tom Reid was a guest at the Sherwood Monday. He was here after men to work on a wreck and secured all he wanted. He said it was his father’s intention to make St. Ignace headquarters for one of his wrecking tugs in the near future.

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It is this issue that completes the ninth volume of the paper and not last week’s as said. The News made its first appearance June 5, 1883.

80 YEARS AGO The St. Ignace Enterprise Thursday, June 2, 1932

The old Mackinac Lumber Company’s storehouse and office building, located in the third ward and erected well over half a century ago, when the lumber boom was in full swing in the upper peninsula is being torn down by Mr. Earl Hall.

The lumber, which is mostly all white pine, is excellent condition and of much quality that it could not be duplicated today. As an example there are a great number of timbers measuring two by twelve inches on the end and 24 feet in length.

The lumber will be sold by Mr. Hall.

•••

Ned Fenlon who has been attending Law School at St. Louis, Missouri returned home for the summer, last Sunday afternoon.

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Approximately 20 tons of Red Cross flour has been given out so far to the needy families in Mackinac County. Much of this flour has been distributed in the west end of the County and also on Mackinac Island.

The supply of small seeds for gardens has been exhausted and no more are to be had. Seed potatoes have also dwindled to about five bushels, and the flour remaining in the several distributing points is about ten tons.

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The official purchase of the Iron Ore Dock by the Michigan State Highway Department from the D. S. S. and A. Railroad was announced yesterday. About 40 men were put to work at once in repairing and getting the dock ready for an early shipment of coal by the Steamer Wyandotte. Further work and elaborate plans have been made for the improvement of the entire docking system at St. Ignace, but as yet are not in detail, much depending on disbursements from the Highway Department at Lansing.

It is, however, known that the newly purchased dock will serve as a general service wharf, from a coal and repair dock to a mooring place in times of inactivity. The land at its foot, together with another 100 feet of frontage, purchased at the same time, is to be cleaned up, and enough room for convenient passage of trucks is to be filled in. The railroad company’s rails and ties are being removed now for this purpose. Whether or not the end of the dock, which at present is in a bad state of repairs is to be torn down or repaired is not known; that too depends on the funds appropriated for the work.

The warehouse, now located at the landing pier, is to be moved to the new site soon, together with all unnecessary odds and ends, which in the past have detracted from the appearance of the entire layout.

Captain Stufflebeam informs us that the landing pier is to be made to serve no other purpose whatsoever. After the present construction work is finished the grounds at the foot of the pier are to be cleaned up and landscaped, which with the pier itself undergoing an entire reconstruction, will give the whole place a pleasing appearance, equaling that of the dock at Mackinaw City, and climaxing a long felt need.

•••

Mr. J. F. Keightley, secretary of the Island Transportation Company, left Saturday for Cheboygan to be present at the final fitting out of the Steamer Algomah, which started on her regular summer run from Mackinaw City to the Island last Monday. The steamer will make four round trips a day.

Mackinac Island Notes

The funeral of the late Julius Andress took place from his residence on Thursday afternoon. The deceased, who was 58 years of age, had died suddenly Monday. He was born in Cheboygan and had lived at Bois Blanc and Cedarville.

As a first class violinist, his services were always in demand at dances and parties. He was a man of very good character and had many friends.

Surviving are the widow, one son, Robert, two daughters, Anne and Margaret. There are also several step-children.

•••

W. L. McIntyre and family have taken the Carrigan farm house at the Annex.

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Michael Earley and family have taken an apartment in the Mission House.

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Island residents are pleased to note that the Nicollet Tea Room, located next to the Windermere Hotel will operate this coming summer under the supervision of Mrs. William Lyman.

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Memorial Day was well observed on the Island Monday, beginning with a special Church service conducted by Rev. Fr. Kennedy at St. Anns. These services were attended by a number of veterans who marched there in a body. At 2 p.m. the parade was formed at the City Hall for the march to the Cemetery. Comrade J. M. Liggett was officer of the day while Commander F. McIntyre was in Command of the Vets. The colors of Post 316, American Legion, led the first division, followed by World War and Spanish American War Veterans, then the Boy Scouts drum Corps and school children. Services were at the grave of Wm. McGrath, an Indian War Veteran and formerly a Solider in Fort Mackinac. 3 volleys were fired by the well drilled firing squad, following which taps were sounded by E. P. LaChance. A large wreath was placed on the grave.

Later the veterans went to the grave of James A. Dolan, World War Veteran where a wreath was silently placed by a flower girl. The concourse then returned to the City Hall where they disbanded.

Mayor Frank Murphy of Detroit was unable to be present to lead the parade as had been expected. He sent as his representative, Mr. James Stackwell, of his office.

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A number of visitors from nearby towns were here to spend the day.

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Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Verner and son, Wesley arrived Saturday from Detroit and are in their home on Lake Shore Drive.

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Mrs. A. Williams of Chicago has opened her home at the Annex.

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Professor E. D. Frye, the well known parachute jumper, is with us again.

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There was a baseball game on Monday at 3 p.m. the players were all local boys.

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The W. T. Bruckners of Chicago opened their home at the Annex.

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Rube Todd has re-painted his house on Market Street.

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The grounds of the Grand Hotel have been under the care of gardeners and green-keepers and they look fine.

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The Algomah began her schedule from Mackinaw on Monday the 30th.

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Miss Alicia Poole has returned from Ann Arbor and is preparing the Iroquois for an early opening.

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A. Marchi (Souvenir Post Cards) is back “right by de Post Office.”

80 YEARS AGO The Republican-News Saturday, June 4, 1932

A timber wolf standing three feet high at the shoulder and measuring six feet long from the nose to the tip of his tail, was trapped by Arthur Moshimer, state hunter, north of the Tahquamenon river.

The wolf, one of the largest ever taken by a state hunter, was probably old, since his teeth were badly worn and broken.

•••

Mr. Earl Hall has men at work tearing down the old Mackinaw Lumber company store across the bay. And so another old land-mark is being razed. At one time it was the center of activity of this city.

Mackinac Island Notes

Manager Walter P. Hill, of Bennett Hall and Cottages, yesterday announced that they will open on Saturday, June 25, for the summer season. They are ideally situated and the hotel is one of the most pleasant on the Island.

•••

Miss Tillie Bird, accompanied by her sister, Mrs. Frank Couchois, arrived here last week Thursday. Miss Bird opened her Orpheum theatre for its first run of the season Sunday evening.

••• Charlevoix’s Tribute to Frank

A. Kenyon.

Taken from The Charlevoix

Sentinel of May 19.

Is short History of His Public

Activities.

In less than three hours after suffering a stroke of apoplexy Friday, May 13, Frank A. Kenyon, a well known representative citizen of Michigan, passed away at the Kenyon residence, 202 Michigan avenue.

Mr. Kenyon, to all appearances, was in his usual health of preceding days and Friday until after the noon hour. The first information otherwise than this was, when shortly before 1 o’clock, Mrs. Kenyon went in to the garage and found him lying on the floor unconscious.

Help was hastily summoned and he was taken into the house. Dr. R. B. Armstrong was called and a few minutes later rendered every possible assistance to relieve the doomed man without success, Mr. Kenyon passing away without regaining consciousness as the hands of the clock were designating the hour of three.

The transition from the known to the unknown, the change from the fullness of mortal life to that of immortality, was instantaneous. For him the great mystery was solved and with it the termination of life’s activities for a man of merit, known for his fidelity in the business affairs of life, honest with his associates, family, and above all else with himself.

He first attained prominence by connection with public affairs in Charlevoix county, when for four years, 1896 to 1900, as county clerk and for four years, 1900 to 1904 as register of deeds. Later upon retirement as a county official, he was postmaster at East Jordan for ten years. For 21 consecutive years prior to May 6, 1931, he was superintendent of Mackinac Island State Park and Michilimackinac State Park, taking the position and assuming the duties incident thereto when each of the properties were in a run-down, deplorable condition such as was a disgrace to a place of such historic interest. With his usual characteristic vigor, coupled with exceptional ability as an executive and knowledge of the work at hand, he worked diligently, changed chaotic conditions and created from practically nothing during his tenure of service, Michigan’s foremost beauty spot. With what reward? Here is the answer under date of May 6, 1931, signed by the secretary of the Mackinac Island State Park Commission to Mr. Kenyon: “It is my duty to inform you that at a meeting of the Mackinac Island State Park Commission, appointed by Governor Brucker, held yesterday, May 5th, in Lansing, you were relieved of your duties as superintendent of Mackinac Island, the same to be effective immediately, your salary, however, to continue to July 1st, 1931.

Later letters of a complimentary nature in which recognition of Mr. Kenyon’s efficiency and ability is given are on file. They make interesting reading, all of which is favorable to Mr. Kenyon and his administration of affairs. He served under Governors Warner, Osborne, Ferris, Groesbeck, Sleeper, Green and Brucker and the several members of the various commissions satisfactorily, eminently so, all of whom appreciated his service and spoke in laudatory terms of his capabilities.

Mr. Kenyon’s dismissal curtly given without warning and to take effect immediately, is considered the most marvelous exhibition of loyal ingratitude ever perpetrated in the history of this commonwealth.

The cash value of Mackinac Island State Park holdings approximates close to $1,000,000 at the time of Mr. Kenyon’s retirement, practically all of which is the product of his untiring energy, foresight and activities in the work entrusted to him, all making for a showing superior to any in state departmental affairs both as to economy of operation and financial worth.

Mr. Kenyon was 62 years old and was born near Watertown, N. Y., December 28, 1869, and 17 years later, with his mother and sister, located at East Jordan, where until within the past year he has claimed his residence and where from the time of attaining his majority until this year he has always enjoyed his right of franchise, usually through the absent voters ballot system. He was a staunch Republican in his political faith and an effective party worker whenever he engaged in political work, which as been rare and seldom if ever indulged in in recent years...

Funeral service was held at the Congregational church Monday afternoon under the auspices of East Jordan Lodge F. & A. M. of which the deceased was a long time honored member, with Rev. G. Russell Parker officiating. Interment was at East Jordan...

He is survived by Mrs. Kenyon with whom he was united in marriage on March 26, 1910, one son, Harold P. Kenyon, of Spring Lake, Mich., and a sister, Mrs. Mary Roy of Elkhart, Indiana.

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