2014-06-14 / Looking Back

Lookiing


Celebrating her 50th anniversary as Lilac Queen is Nancy Chambers LaBorde of Crivitz, Wisconsin. She is pictured in the white gown with her fellow 1964 Lilac Court members (from left) Mary Lou Francis, Nowella Visnaw, Phoebe Cadotte, Mary Andress, Kay Cowell, and Faye Cowell. (Photograph courtesy of Candy Smith) Celebrating her 50th anniversary as Lilac Queen is Nancy Chambers LaBorde of Crivitz, Wisconsin. She is pictured in the white gown with her fellow 1964 Lilac Court members (from left) Mary Lou Francis, Nowella Visnaw, Phoebe Cadotte, Mary Andress, Kay Cowell, and Faye Cowell. (Photograph courtesy of Candy Smith) 100 YEARS AGO

The St. Ignace Enterprise

Thursday, June 11, 1914

The improvements that have been under way to the Holden sample room and billiard parlor have been completed and the place is more inviting than ever.

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Manager Mulverhill of the St. Ignace exchange spent several days on the Island during the past week making repairs to the local lines and installing phone in the summer cottages.

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The Herold restaurant and amusement parlors have been thoroughly renovated and overhauled this spring and are in the best possible shape for the expected big season.

100 YEARS AGO

The Republican-News

Saturday, June 13, 1914

From Mackinac Island: A new cooler has been built for Arnie Hoban’s meat market and store by Chapman & Hough, the contractors.

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Anthony Corrigan and Wm. Marshall lost a cow each last Friday. The animals were in a pasture where some empty paint pails had been dumped; one of these pails had been a butter firkin and in licking it the cows became victims of lead or arsenical poisoning.

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McNally & Donnelly are in their summer quarters, the Chicago meat market.

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Miss Susan Breuckman returned from Detroit Tuesday. She had been attending Liggett school. She was accompanied by her sister, Mrs. Ward Dygert, to spend a week with her parents.

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Mayor Bailey and his associates in the administration of municipal affairs this spring took hold of the question of improvements with a vim, and the work done reflects credit on the businesslike methods that have prevailed in carrying those improvements out.

Firstly, the city hall: This building has been vastly changed, repaired and painted throughout, the cells changed round to a row in the rear and the toilet moved also to the back, with a cement floor underneath the whole of this portion – the toilet will now be available all the year; at the entrance is the large vestibule with the clerk’s office on the right and the justice’s court on the left; these have had new floors laid, have been completely overhauled and the walls murescoed.

Upstairs, the city marshal’s office, and the council chamber, have been refitted throughout. At one end of the latter is the raised rostrum, with ornamental rail, and the finishing woodwork is all in southern cypress. A long oak table occupies the center, and handsome leather-seated chairs have been proved for the aldermen of the council and the city officials. Seating for the public is also furnished in the space allotted for that purpose. With new floors, walls replastered and suitable decorative work, the room presents a very neat and attractive appearance.

It is proposed to add a tower to the firehall for drying hose. The hall itself has been included in the general overhauling, and the apparatus properly stowed. Finally, the whole city lot has been tidied up and will ultimately be a pretty fenced park.

The public cemeteries have been cleaned up at public expense and it is Mayor Bailey’s intention to name a board of trustees to keep them properly cared for.

The city dump has received its share of attention and has been placed in charge of a competent man, David Secord.

Some excellent work has been done on the streets, consisting of grading, claying and graveling. The much-used Truscott hill, and the hill at the Grand hotel have been thus repaired and improved. On Market street, beginning at Benjamin’s blacksmith shop, 300 feet of 8-foot cement walk have been laid, with 6-inch grout and necessary retaining wall. The bank next to Ray Davis’ residence has been cut down, thus widening the street.

Along the bay, eastwards from the Chippewa, is to be the site of the new life saving station. The old board walk has been torn up, but nothing done to replace it because the U.S. officials have signified that all improvements will be cared for by them.

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From City Council Proceedings, June 10: It is the desire of the Public Health committee that all manure heaps should during this week be removed to the dumping ground, that during the season the manure should be carted away twice a week. We suggest that in case there is no ordinance now in force, that the committee on ordinances draft one to cover the matter above stated, also that the prices charged for garbage disposal in 1913 are the proper prices for the season 1914.

80 YEARS AGO

The Republican-News and St. Ignace Enterprise

Thursday, June 14, 1934

The first water taxi service of the season by speed boat between Mackinac Island and St. Ignace was begun here last week when the “Tabasco” was put in commission by Captain Duncan McGregor. Paul Smitley, experienced speedboat driver, is operating the craft. Several trips are being made each day.

McGregor’s water taxi service will be available all summer, says the captain, and will be enlarged to accommodate the demand. It is planned to operate on regular schedule by the first of the month.

Boats leave the McGregor dock at the Shell gas station, St. Ignace, where will be the headquarters of the service.

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Word has reached St. Ignace that Jack Dempsey, former world’s heavy-weight champion, is expected to visit Mackinac Island, arriving some time between Jul 20 and August 20. It is believed that Dempsey is seriously considering the establishment of a fighters’ training camp on the Island.

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Mackinac Island is to have a liquor store, to be opened shortly in the Lasley building, according to reports. Dunleavy Flanagan has been named manager and Raymond McIntyre, cashier. A stock of fine liquors has been shipped and it is hoped to have the store opened before this week is out.

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The Delia Welcher Gift Shop, located next to the Bailey Drug Store, will be open for the summer season on June 15.

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That neat and attractive eating place on the water front, known as The Wandrie Restaurant, opened for business last Sunday, and has been enjoying a good patronage. Mr. and Mrs. Otto Wandrie, the proprietors, give it their personal attention, assuring prompt and efficient service and good home-cooked meals.

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It is planned, according to reports, to have the Mackinac Island resort hotels and homes all open before July 4. Mackinac Island business men and residents have spared no pains this spring to make the “Fairy Isle” most attractive to summer visitors, and that Michigan resort is certainly looking the part.

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Bennett Hall, located along the harbor front, just out of the downtown traffic, will open for the summer season June 18. Walter P. Hill, owner of Bennett Hall and Cottages, arrived some time ago from Rockledge, Florida, where he operates the New Indian River Hotel, and has his Island places in shape for the season.

50 YEARS AGO

The Republican-News and St. Ignace Enterprise

Thursday, June 11, 1964

Nancy Marie Chambers, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Chambers of Mackinac Island, was selected Queen of Lilac Day at Mackinac Island, which will be held June 14.

Her court will be Mary Louise Francis, Faye Cowell, Kay Cowell, Mary Andress, Nowella Visnaw, and Phoebe Cadotte.

The queen will be crowned this Saturday night at Grand Hotel at 9 a.m. by the president of the Chamber of Commerce, Sam McIntire. Immediately following will be the Coronation Ball to be held at the Community Hall. Tickets will be available at the hall and at the information booth. There will be a parade at 2 p.m. Sunday, June 14, starting at Mission Point.

Parade chairman is John Blos- wick; parade band chairman is Nathan Shyne, former president of the Mackinac Island Chamber of Commerce; Lilac chairman is Mrs. Marie Moeller; the queen’s mother will be her own mother, Mrs. Joyce Chambers.

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The E. Hoover Bankard family have arrived from Spring Lake to open their summer home on the West Bluff.

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Ronald Dufina returned Friday for the summer. Ronald attends Western at Kalamazoo. Mr. Dufina motored to Kalamazoo to pick up his son.

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Wilma Fisher, Lynda Horn, Beverly Brown, and Joseph Paul Michalke received their diplomas Thursday at LaSalle High School in St. Ignace. Attending the graduation exercises were the John Fisher family, Archie Horn family, Jack Brown family, Mrs. Francis Michalke, Mr. and Mrs. B.W. Squires, Mrs. Hugh Ru- dolph, and Mr. and Mrs. Alan Sawyer and daughter Joan.

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Mrs. Philip Hart and son of Washington, D.C., spent a few days visiting the Hugh Rudolph family, Mrs. Hart preparing the opening of their summer home on the East Bluff.

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The Ignatius Palermo family of St. Clair Shores have arrived and on Saturday Mr. Palermo opened the Chatterbox Restaurant.

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Virginia McIntyre arrived Sunday from Marygrove College in Detroit, to spend the summer with her mother, Mrs. R.D. McIntyre.

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S/4 Richard Andress of Fort Huachaco, Arizona, is enjoying a furlough visiting his mother, Mrs. Gladys Andress.

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Mr. and Mrs. George W. Lapine are receiving congratulations on the birth of a son, George Walter Lapine, Jr., June 2, at the Mackinac Island Medical Center.

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